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Reserved Observations Catalog

The Spitzer Reserved Observations Catalog V18.0
Issued: 01 Feb 2017

Leopard is the best, easiest way to search the ROC for targets.

What is the ROC?
Search the ROC
Download the ROC
Pictures of and stats on the ROC
How and when to use the ROC
Notes on the ROC
Information regarding IERs in the ROC



What is the ROC?

The Spitzer Reserved Observations Catalog (ROC) is defined to be the set of of detailed approved observations for Spitzer for all program types.

In general the Spitzer Science Center will not allow a duplication of observations listed in the ROC. Refer to Spitzer Observing Rule #2 for details on what constitutes a candidate for duplication of observations.

The ROC is dynamic, representing the set of planned and executed observations at any time. Leopard is better to use for ROC searches because it accesses the real-time database of planned and executed Spitzer observations.



Search the ROC

Search for targets in the ROC using Leopard .

Leopard is available for download as part of Spitzer Pride. Once you have Leopard running, select "By Position" from the "Query" menu or type Ctrl+U. There you can enter the name of the target and any additional info, resolve the coordinates of the target using NED or SIMBAD, and click "OK". A list of AORs queried from the archive will then be loaded into the Leopard window, and you will be able to see the status of the observation, the date the data was released into the archive, and the date the observation was scheduled. Note that the AOR Status field value of "available" means "available for scheduling," not "the data are available." If the data have been observed and released into the archive, the status is "nominal.".



Download the ROC

Each pointed observation is itemized on one line. These are plain text files with pipe-delimited fields (useful for loading into Excel if desired).

Note: These files represent a snapshot of the database and do not contain any observations added or modified in the database after the files were created.

Only IRAC Ch. 1 and 2 Observations:
Warm Fixed Targets
Warm Moving Targets

All Instruments at All Wavelengths:
Fixed Targets
Moving Targets

There is still a list of the full program titles and principal investigators (Plain Text).



Pictures of & stats on the ROC

Graphical representations of the ROC
From the 01 Feb 2017 ROC:



Red=MIPS, green=IRS, blue=IRAC
Click for a larger version

Statistics on the ROC
Statistics on the database as of February 2017 (includes all science observations):

AOT#Observations hrs
IracMap 18991 11136
IracMapPC 102396 71485
IrsMap 3359 5144
IrsPeakupImage 1210 628
IrsStare 19512 12071
MipsPhot 13490 6294
MipsScan 3945 6101
MipsSed 1047 484
MipsTp 178 67
  Total hours Hours observed or scheduled
GTO 6513 6513
DDT 4210 4209
GO1 3366 3366
GO2 4740 4740
GO3 4179 4179
GO4 3936 3936
GO5 3702 3702
GO6* 12049 12049
GO7 2838 2838
GO8* 10298 10298
GO9 9063 9063
GO10 5850 5723
GO11* 10057 9622
GO12 1522 1513
GO13 4756 1674
LEGACY 12418 9436

Note: The GTO and Legacy categories include GTO and legacy programs from all cycles. The Cycle 13 Frontier Legacy programs are in the Legacy catagory.
* Note: The GO6, GO8 and GO11 categories includes Exploration Science Programs.



How and when to use the ROC

How to use the Spitzer Reserved Observations Catalog (ROC)

    Remember, the ROC is a dynamic list, consisting of the set of planned and executed Spitzer observations.

    Both Spot and Leopard can search the ROC. Leopard provides more flexibility and is the preferred tool, but Spot is what you use for observation planning, so quick checks for a given target/mode can be done easily via Spot.

    Example 1: Has someone already planned an observation of X?
    Search for targets in the ROC using Leopard.

    Leopard is available for download as part of Spitzer Pride. Once you have Leopard running, select "By Position" from the "Query" menu or type Ctrl+U. There you can enter the name of the target and any additional info, resolve the coordinates of the target using NED or SIMBAD, and click "OK". A list of AORs queried from the archive will then be loaded into the Leopard window, and you will be able to see the status of the observation, the date the data was released into the archive, and the date the observation was scheduled. Note that the AOR status field value of "available" means "available for scheduling," not "the data are available." If the data have been observed and released into the archive, the status is "nominal."

    The list of the full program titles and principal investigators (Plain Text, 324 KB) can be useful if you want to search by topic or PI; the abstracts are also avalible in ADS. Leopard can also bring up a list of PIs.

    Example 2: Downloading programs into Spot, part 1: how to do it
    You can view all of the approved programs via Spot or Leopard, but to view all of the contents of a specific program, you need to know the program name or number. These are both provided via a Leopard or Spot search. To load a program in Spot, choose "View Program" from the File menu and enter the corresponding name or number. Or, in Leopard, search by program and enter the program number.

    If you want to find all of the Legacy AORs, see the Legacy Programs page to get the P.I. For the Exploration Science AORS, see the Exploration Science Programs page. All of the First Look Survey AORs are listed under P.I. Soifer (because the FLS is Director's Discretionary Time).

    Example 3: Downloading programs into Spot, part 2: why you would want to do it
    The "download program" feature is incredibly useful for two primary reasons. (1) When learning how to use Spitzer, it is useful to see what options other investigators chose. Using the online abstracts, you might find a program similar to your planned observations, and you can then see if their AOT options will work for your purposes. (2) Some of the maps can be quite big, and the date on which it was observed (or the range of dates in which it might be observed) can be important. To see if your target is already observed, Leopard (or Spot) will return a range of possible hits; Leopard can also easily visualize the AORs for the specific date and time on which it was observed (if it has been observed). You should load and examine programs (using either Spot or Leopard) for nearby targets and see if the existing map covers the region you want.

When to use the ROC

    The ROC should be used to determine if any observations you are planning to do with Spitzer are in conflict with those already reserved by any of our approved programs. In general the SSC will not allow a duplication of observations listed in the ROC. Refer to Spitzer Observing Rule #2 for details on what constitutes a candidate for duplication of observations.



Notes on the ROC

In general, the specified position of an observation in the plain text ROC will be at the center of any requested map. Observers should take map center offsets into consideration when searching for possible duplications. The mapped area columns in the ROC indicate the approximate area on the sky and do not imply that depth coverage is the same throughout the map.

Observations tagged as GENERIC can 'move' up to 2 degrees. See the Warm Spitzer Observers Manual for more information about Generic targets.

A note about Guaranteed Time Observations and the title Principal Investigator (PI): All Spitzer Programs must have a Principal Investigator. Many of the Spitzer GTOs are collaborating on various observing programs, contributing some of their time allocation to form Shared Time Programs. There are over two dozen of these Shared Time Programs within the ROC. In the case of a Shared Time Program the PI need not be a GTO and in a few cases a non-GTO was chosen to be PI of the Program.

There are duplications within the ROC. In some cases these are due to requested return visits to targets for temporal studies. In other cases the investigators split up observations into multiple AORs to work around the maximum time duration per AOR restrictions. Also, a few Shared Time Programs return to some targets to increase integration times or for temporal studies. These are not considered conflicting duplications since one of the contributing GTOs in the Shared Time Program is PI of the apparent duplicate observation.



Information regarding IERs in the ROC

Several GO and instrument calibration programs (mostly IRAC) have used Instrument Engineering Requests (IERs) to obtain observations. Below is a list of all GO programs that have used IERs. The central positions and some other basic information (eg. the program's abstract) for these IERs can be found in Leopard or in the ROC (starting with Version 9.1). IER entries in the ROC can be indentified by an AOT field equal to "irs", "irac", or "mips". Because an IER does not, by definition, conform to our AOR standard, it is not possible to display detailed information about the observation within Spot or Leopard. The best way to determine what data were taken in the IER is to download the data and examine them.

PIDNo. IERsInstrumentScience CategoryProgram Title
815MIPSHigh-z Galaxies (z>0.5)The Deep Infrared Sky
2826IRACExtrasolar PlanetsExploring the thermal emission of two new transiting planets from the WASP survey
2972IRACExtrasolar PlanetsHAT-P-2b: A Direct Glimpse at the Stormiest Exoplanet
4613IRACExtrasolar PlanetsProbing water vapor and CO in the atmosphere of HD 209458b
4632IRACExtrasolar PlanetsSolving the Mystery of the Largest Transiting Planet
4792IRACCircumstellar/Debris DisksSpitzer Light Curve of Z Cha
4861IRACExtrasolar PlanetsFirst atmospheric study of the young massive planet CoRoT-Exo-2b
4861IRACExtrasolar PlanetsFirst atmospheric study of the young massive planet CoRoT-Exo-2b
4954IRACExtrasolar PlanetsHD 40307b, the first transiting Super-Earth?
5253IRACExtrasolar PlanetsThermal Inversion in the atmosphere of XO-3b
5348IRACExtrasolar PlanetsCoRoT-Exo-7b: Confirming the first transiting rocky planet
5462IRACExtrasolar PlanetsSearch for rings and satellites around the temperate exoplanet CoRo T-9b
109941MIPSZodiacal DustExploration of the Earth's Resonant Ring
36586IRSCometsComet 9P/Tempel 1 During the Deep Impact Encounter
200791IRACBrown Dwarfs/Very Low Mass StarsA Sensitive Search for Variability in Late L dwarfs: the Quest for Weather
205232IRACExtrasolar Planets Direct Study of Exoplanet Thermal Emission
301299IRACExtrasolar PlanetsTarget of Opportunity: New Observable Transiting Extrasolar Planets
304731IRSExtrasolar PlanetsA Spitzer Spectrum of the Transiting Exoplanet HD 189733b
305901IRACExtrasolar Planets CO and H2O absorptions in the atmosphere of the transiting planet HD189733b
30594120MIPSISMMIPSGAL II: Surveying the innermost part of the Galactic plane at 24 and 70 microns with MIPS
308252IRACExtrasolar PlanetsHD 189733b: As The World Turns
308792IRACExtrasolar PlanetsThermal Emission from Extrasolar Planet XO-1
401351IRACExtrasolar PlanetsIntense Photometry of the Exotic Exoplanet HD 149026b
402385IRACExtrasolar PlanetsA search for Mars-mass extrasolar planets with Spitzer
402803IRACExtrasolar PlanetsPortraits of Distant Worlds: Mapping the Atmospheres of Hot Jupiters
403862IRACExtrasolar PlanetsThe Big Swing: Observing the Periastron Passage of HD 80606b
406858IRACExtrasolar PlanetsTarget of Opportunity: New Transiting Exoplanets
407322IRACExtrasolar PlanetsCO and H2O in the exoplanetary atmosphere of HD189733b (continued)
407803IRACExtrasolar PlanetsSecondary eclipses of XO planets
500516IRACExtrasolar PlanetsA Search for Water on a Neptune-Mass Transiting Planet
500566IRACExtrasolar PlanetsMapping the Atmospheres of the Smallest Transiting Exoplanets
504402IRACExtrasolar PlanetsThermal Emission from the Super-Earth Orbiting GJ 876
504422IRACExtrasolar PlanetsHot Jupiters: Atmospheric Constraints from Repeated Eclipses
5051711IRACExtrasolar PlanetsNew Transiting Exoplanets: Targets of Opportunity for Spitzer's Legacy
507347IRACExtrasolar PlanetsIRAC Observations of Weather and Tidal Heating on Gliese 436 b
5074710IRACExtrasolar PlanetsAs the World Turns: Discrete Observations of a Pseudo-Synchronized Eccentric Transiting Planet
507595IRACExtrasolar PlanetsSearching for hot stratospheres of new transiting exoplanets from the WASP survey
6002134IRACPCExtrasolar PlanetsDynamic Studies of Exoplanet Atmospheres: From Global Properties to Local Physics
600272IRACPCExtrasolar PlanetsDetecting the Transits of Nearby Super-Earths
600586IRACPCExtrasolar PlanetsDynamic atmosphere of the eccentric and massive planet XO-3b
601025IRACPCExtrasolar PlanetsTwo for the Show: Observing the Periastron Passages of HD 80606 b
601854IRACPCExtrasolar PlanetsLightcurves of two newly discovered ultra-short period planets
700312IRACPCExtrasolar Planets Search for rings and satellites around the temperate exoplanet CoRoT-9b
7004924IRACPCExtrasolar Planets Towards Earths and Beyond: the GJ1214 Opportunity
700604IRACPCExtrasolar Planets Balancing the Budget: Simultaneous Near- and Mid-IR Phase Curves of WASP12-b
80040292IRACPCYoung Stellar Objects YSOVAR II: Mapping YSO Inner Disk Structure in NGC 2264 with Simultaneous Spitzer and CoRoT Time Series Photometry
800734IRACPCExtrasolar Planets Life on the Edge: Planetary Atmospheres in Extreme Environments
100609IRACPCCompact Objects Watching a supermassive black hole eat -- Sgr A* and cloud G2

The IERs from program 30594 span a large area of sky. Because it is not possible to convey the extent of their coverage in the ROC, nor is it possible to use "Overlay AOR" feature within Leopard/Spot to examine the coverage, we are providing the overlay mapping files for these AORs. To use them you will first need to display an image of the region--you can get the central coordinate of the IER using Leopard or the ROC (only AORs can be displayed in the Observations tab of Spot). Then select "Overlays"->"Read AOR Overlay Mapping File..." and choose the .pts file that corresponds to the IER you would like displayed.

For individual mapping files click here. For a gzipped tarball of all 120 pointing files click here.